Strung Out (08 octobre 2005)



Julien et moi avons eu la chance de rencontrer Chris Aiken et Jake Kiley, respectivement bassiste et guitariste de STRUNG OUT, lors de leur passage à Montréal la semaine dernière. Les gars sont extrêmement sympathiques, terre-à-terre et ont des opinions très intéressants sur l’état courant de la scène punk rock . Voici un résumé de notre entretien :

[MATH] You guys have been part of this year’s Warped Tour. Speaking of that event, it’s hard not to say that the whole thing is really different than what it was ten years ago. Can you tell us a bit about how you picture the whole thing? What are the positive and negative aspects of it? Like for instance, what good can possibly come out of sponsors like Energizer, Cingular, MasterCard, CircuitCity?...

[JAKE] I guess it’s good for the Warped Tour, it just brings it more exposure, it’s not a bad thing in itself. You know there’s two ways to look at the Warped Tour: It’s cool because you can get everything you want out of it... You know you come to see all these bands, you see them all for like thirty bucks and you can rely on the tour to come every year and thats what they base all there appeal on... I think it had the right intentions through a long time but taking a few years off from it and then coming back and doing it now it changed so much... There’s no skate scene involved in it anymore, it’s not the Vans fucking Warped Tour anymore... It’s like the Hot Topic-Mastercard Warped Tour! (laughs) ... You know, to me punk rock was supposed to be an individual thing: you go out there and have a good time... Now half of the kids wear DEAD KENNEDYS or IRON MAIDEN shirts when they never even heard of those bands! It’s like if they were trying to fit into something...I never want to see punk rock become the mainstream or become the next glam metal...

[MATH] Punk rock has definitely changed a lot in the past years, would you be able to tell us one new band that you’r e into right now?

[JAKE] Hum...(long hesitation.) ... No! Sorry... Honestly dude, I don’t even check that out anymore, except for shit that is anything like punk rock. I’ve become over-saturated with it all. You know there is too much punk rock around right now...we’d rather listen to our old shit that we grew up on and that gave us influence ten years ago... I mean, you got to stay current, but you also got to stay true. We’re not gonna go like “Ok there is this new scene and we have to be a part of it to exist”. We’ve been around for more than ten years, right now we’re doing the biggest tour we’ve ever done. I like to think that we’ve modified ourselves but stayed true to our style. I think that if you were a Strung Out fan ten years ago, you’ll still enjoy what we’re putting out now.

[MATH] That’s what is awesome with our scene right now. The fact that the most relevant bands are the oldest one, bands like NOFX and BAD RELIGION still mean a lot to kids...

[JAKE] They’re the ones that have been doing it right... We’ve based our career on those type of bands: They went out and toured, and didn’t made a big deal about themselves. They didn’t try to become these superstars, they were happy to be doing it for the people, under the radar of the mainstream. If the mainstream embraces you and makes you a big deal, you’re dying… You have a couple of years, then you’re done. Think about it: It will shorten you career usually... If you’re the big band of 2001 - I don’t know who that was – now who the fuck, if you’re a trendy kid, would want to listen to that band? Now whatever band is big this year, will be dead in two years. So that’s why we’re like “You know what? We’ll do we’ll just playing our own type of show with our fans”. We just like to be one-on-one with the fans and show them that we’re in it together with them, you know, we’re no better than them. We’re just a band that write songs for ourselves and that, they can connect with too... It’s really cool to have that.

[MATH] You’re right when you say that you guys really stayed true to your roots. You’ve been with Fat Wreck Chords since day one...

[JAKE] They’ve done a good job they’re fair people, they’re honest with us. They don’t promise us the world and they’re not gonna get you all these magazine covers but you can trust them and you know they are a home for you. I think that’s important in the music industry.

[MATH] They’re the biggest independent label right now. I think we cannot really consider Epitaph, Vagrant and Drive-Thru anymore...

[JAKE] Those are all half major labels...so that’s why their bands are getting a lot more push...

[JULIEN] The majority of these labels are getting distributed by real majors like Warner or Universal...

[JAKE] The bands on these labels will sell five hundred thousand records and not get paid! We’re happy on a label on which we’ll sell fifty thousand records and make a good something. These bands will sell ten times that to these stupid radio mall kids, but there’s not loyalty there, and they’re not making the money. And by the time they’ll come to make the money, like in three or four years, when they’re out of debt, the kids will have forgotten about them...I learned that from watching other people... So many bands got bigger than us, and some of our friends have signed to major labels... Things are looking well from the outside, but you talk to them and they’re like “Dude I haven’t got paid in six months”... The majors want to sign up everything that sounds like one specific thing, they just want to own the bands. They’ll say “Ok, this band is successful, let’s sign all these similar bands, and not even put out their records! We’ll sign them, give em money and then shelf them.” They’ll eat up young bands like that so it’s really scary. You got to be careful, they’re like sharks: They’ve been doing this shit for twenty, thirty, fourty, they know how to screw artists over. We always thought “We’ll start independent then we’ll sign to a major” but the more and more we’ve heard from these majors, then the more we’ve heard from our friends that have tried it, we decided not to. As a band, you alway want to keep growing and it’s tempting to see what would it be like to have that big company promoting you, but usually they want to change your identity as well... If you want to be in music for a short time and make some money, then try that but, to me, this is the thing that I’ve wanted to do since I was twelve years old. I love this, I love being right here in the bus, I like being on the road, the shows, and I want do this until I’m like eighty... After this band I want to keep doing music. It’s in me, there’s no way for me to do anything else, I don’t think I’d be happy. I got too much out of this to just throw it away.

[MATH] I believe a lot of your songs would translate really well acoustically. Has it ever crossed your mind to put out any acoustic material since you’ve released a song for the Punk Goes Acoustic compilation?

[JAKE] I don’t know if we’ll ever do that... We’ve actually done two songs: We performed an acoustic version of Angeldust for a radio station that is coming out on a DVD we’re gonna do... I guess if a song is solid it can fit every kind of genre. The song and the melody have to be good, it shouldn’t be all gimmicky. Right now you hear all those emo bands with that really whiny tone of voice: That’s a fuckin gimmick. No one is reinventing the wheel here... Don’t just follow what musical trends dictate. I know we couldn’t do it. If we cashed in, trying to be a part of something, we would have to live with that success of being what we’re not really proud of. That’s the touchy thing: If you put something out and you don’t believe in it and it fails, then you regret... And a lot of pressure is coming with that: You can’t walk out in the street without having people bugging you, I don’t really want that. For me, if I see a kid with a STRUNG OUT shirt, that means so much more. It’s really a true thing and they know something about our band. It’s not like if they know you from Access Hollywood... On our side, we have to stay consistent. Most of the bands make the mistake to take too long to come back. We try to stay consistent and come back here every two years or more, we put out a record on a schedule… Otherwise people will forget about you. We are getting overloaded with so many bands these days that for us, to survive, we got to keep our name out there... I feel so fortunate and lucky to still have the success we have today.

[MATH] And speaking of consistency, if you guys keep going at the same pace, we’ll have a new record somewhere next year...

[JAKE] Probably not too soon… We’re a little ahead of our touring schedule right now. Our last record hasen’t even been out for a year and we’ve toured everywhere. Usually it takes us two and a half years form one record to the other one to come out so we have like a year and a half to get another one out according to our shedule. Right now we’re gonna come home from this tour, take some time off, just kind of get our heads together, get some inspiration going, do a few more tours next year, then we’ll start writing. We got to figure what we wannna do because we never want to repeat ourselves, and now that we’ve covered so much...

[MATH] Exile In Oblivion was really different from the other albums...

[JAKE] Its the hardest we’ve ever work on an album. It’s the deepest-ly done, we have to make this next one even better and deeper, but different. I like our last record but its all about how we’re gonna make something different and better. The challenge is all ours and I think we can do it...

Petite note en terminant: Il a été fait mention d’un DVD dans l’entrevue. Julien et moi avons eu la chance de visionner quelques extraits, dont cette fameuse version acoustique d’Angeldust. Même si le tout n’en est encore qu’à la pré production, ce que nous avons pu voir s’annonce très prometteur… Un gros merci à Rob de Fat Wreck Chords pour avoir rendu cette entrevue possible.
- Math

www.fatwreck.com

www.strungout.com



En savoir plus Entrevues les plus récentesLire les commentaires (0)Ajouter un commentaire